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McGill Employees Receive Stream Bank Repair Certification

Dori Sabeh and Caroline Heathcoat Complete NC State University Workshop

In March, North Carolina State University held a Stream Bank Repair Certification Workshop that teaches attendees “how to protect and improve the natural environment of streams by stabilizing the stream bank and other eroding areas.” Two of our Raleigh water resources engineering team members – Dori Sabeh, PE, GISP, and Caroline Heathcoat, EI – attended the workshop, passed the certification exam, and were given Stream Bank Repair Certifications. We asked Dori and Caroline what they learned, how it might be helpful to their projects, and what they are excited about in the stream bank repair world.

What new information did you learn in the workshop? How will this help you in your projects?

Dori Sabeh, PE, GISP

Dori Sabeh, PE, GISP: The workshop provided hands-on experience for stabilizing blowouts and bank erosion. We went through various live stakes and bioengineering stabilization options. The main helpful item for our restoration projects is to know the limit of repair work that can be done without triggering a US Army Corps of Engineers permit requirement.

Caroline Heathcoat, EI

Caroline Heathcoat, EI: This workshop mainly covered basic vegetative stream repair. We learned what the signs of a healthy verses unhealthy stream were and when we could use vegetative repair methods verses more drastic stream restoration methods. It also specified what actions we could take with and without a permit. My favorite part, personally, was that the workshop took place in the back yard of a Raleigh resident who had agreed to let us use his yard in exchange for getting his back yard stream bank repaired. We got to see and participate in a stream bank repair, which gave me a good idea of what these projects actually look like and what kind of sites would be good for these projects.

Hands-on stream bank repair during workshop

What aspect of stream bank repair do you find most exciting?

Sabeh: I am excited to help our clients improve the natural system by providing effective maintenance measures that can be easily implemented and provide an opportunity to engage volunteers from the community.

Heathcoat: I am excited that this is becoming a more mainstream solution for minor stream bank repair projects. Vegetative stream bank repair is more sustainable, leads to better water quality and biodiversity, and is very aesthetically pleasing, so it is great to see it marketed to both the public and engineers as an encouraged solution.

From Knowledge to Action: Water Resources Engineering

Our water resources team can help with stream bank repairs, stormwater support, infrastructure design, floodplain management, and more. Check out the Rhodes Pond Case study to learn how our team designed and permitted repairs and overtopping protection for the dam to withstand a 100-year flow event.

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